Bird Finder

Bird Finder for June 2, 2017: Red-eyed Vireo

The Red-Eyed Vireo is widely distributed throughout Connecticut wherever forested habitats are present. This bird prefers to forage and nest in deciduous forests and is a very successful breeder throughout the state. A large chunky bird, the Red-Eyed Vireo has an angular head, thick neck with a long thick bill with a hook at the end. It is a “warbler like” bird.

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Fox Sparrow: Bird Finder for March 16, 2017

Fox Sparrows have been reported under snowy feeders in Glastonbury, Ellington, West Hartford, Wethersfield, Bethel, and Harwinton. In other words, pretty much everywhere.

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White-rumped Sandpiper: Bird Finder for May 26, 2017

White-rumped Sandpiper favors coastal shorelines and mudflats at the state’s top shorebird stopovers such as Milford Point, Sandy Point in West Haven and Hammonasset Beach State Park in Madison.

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Hooded Warbler: Bird Finder for May 19, 2017

Usually first noticed by a ringing “weeta, weeta, weeteeo” song, a Hooded Warbler sighting highlights almost any bird walk in the Connecticut woods.

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Bird Finder for May 13, 2017: Rose-breasted Grosbeak

The Rose-breasted Grosbeak, returns from the Caribbean to Connecticut during the spring migration.

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Bird Finder for May 6, 2017: Summer Tanager

The Summer Tanager is a rare migrant in Connecticut woodlands, usually seen in mid-May.

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Upland Sandpiper: Bird Finder for April 20, 2017

The best time to locate an Upland Sandpiper in Connecticut is when the species is en route to its northerly breeding grounds in April.

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Pectoral Sandpiper: Bird Finder for April 6, 2017

This is an uncommon species in Connecticut, but also a wide-ranging one.

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Bird Finder for March 24, 2017: Wilson’s Snipe

In Connecticut Wilson’s Snipe are found most often in wet farm fields and sedge meadows, usually bordering a stream or wet swale.

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Bird Finder for March 10, 2017: Timberdoodle (aka American Woodcock)

Few of the mating performances of our birds are more remarkable than the sky dance of the American Woodcock in early spring.

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