Bird Finder

Baird’s Sandpiper

August 17, 2017. Baird’s Sandpiper is a long-distance Central Flyway migrant from its high Arctic breeding grounds to South America, straying east to Connecticut in late summer and autumn. When here, they’re found on mudflats, the edges of grassy ponds and marshes, and beaches above the wrack line.

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Black Vulture

August 11, 2017. Black Vulture. Not all that long ago, Connecticut birders would form a posse to go chasing reports of Black Vultures in the state. These days the species is pretty common.

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Tree Swallow

In a few short weeks Tree Swallows will begin their southward migration, gathering near the mouth of the Connecticut River.

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Semipalmated Plover

July 25, 2017. Semipalmated Plovers have recently reappeared on Connecticut beaches, right on time at the beginning of their fall migration.

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Roseate Tern

July 20, 2017. July and August is a good time to look for this endangered bird from the shores of Long Island Sound.

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Clapper Rail

July 14, 2017. These marsh birds are known for their elusive nature and are more often heard than seen.

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Purple Martin

July 7, 2017 — Purple Martins are the largest of the seven swallow family members that one can observe in Connecticut.

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Fox Sparrow

March 16, 2017. Fox Sparrows have been reported under snowy feeders in Glastonbury, Ellington, West Hartford, Wethersfield, Bethel, and Harwinton. In other words, pretty much everywhere.

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Cliff Swallow

June 29, 2017. Cliff Swallows attach their mud nests to vertical surfaces such as the walls of buildings and the sides of bridge girders, usually beneath some kind of overhang or covering. Most of the nesting occurs in the western part of the state, including on several bridges over the Housatonic River in Litchfield County.

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Canada Warbler

June 23, 2017. During the breeding season, Canada Warblers are found in mixed coniferous-deciduous forests with a well-developed understory, which often includes dense stands of mountain laurel.

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