Bird Finder

Fox Sparrow: Bird Finder for March 16, 2017

Fox Sparrows have been reported under snowy feeders in Glastonbury, Ellington, West Hartford, Wethersfield, Bethel, and Harwinton. In other words, pretty much everywhere.

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Upland Sandpiper: Bird Finder for April 20, 2017

The best time to locate an Upland Sandpiper in Connecticut is when the species is en route to its northerly breeding grounds in April.

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Pectoral Sandpiper: Bird Finder for April 6, 2017

This is an uncommon species in Connecticut, but also a wide-ranging one.

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Bird Finder for March 24, 2017: Wilson’s Snipe

In Connecticut Wilson’s Snipe are found most often in wet farm fields and sedge meadows, usually bordering a stream or wet swale.

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Bird Finder for March 10, 2017: Timberdoodle (aka American Woodcock)

Few of the mating performances of our birds are more remarkable than the sky dance of the American Woodcock in early spring.

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Barnacle Goose: Bird Finder for February 18, 2017

Barnacle Goose. Vagrant Barnacle Geese can be found in Connecticut, with the most reliable location today being along the Connecticut River in Enfield

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Eared Grebe: Bird Finder for February 1, 2017

Eared Grebe s a rare species in Connecticut, but during the past few weeks one (or maybe two different ones) have been seen at Stratford Point and Fort Nathan Hale in New Haven harbor.

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Bird Finder for January 27, 2017: Harlequin Duck

Harlequin Duck: Taking its name from a colorfully dressed character in Commedia dell’arte and long touted to be the “fashion plate of the winter seas,” Harlequin Duck is a rare sight in Connecticut.

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Bird Finder for January 13, 2017: Saw-whet Owl

The Northern Saw-whet Owl is widely distributed throughout Connecticut wherever large tracts of forested land are present

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Northern Shoveler: Bird Finder for January 6, 2017

Northern Shoveler: One of the most distinctive of our dabbling ducks, small numbers of Northern Shovelers are most frequently seen in our area in late winter and early spring.

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