Center at Fairfield

What to do with “Abandoned” or “Orphaned” Wildlife

The best advice is to leave baby birds, like this Purple Martin, when you found them. Photo by Stephanie Galea/The Connecticut Audubon Society

The best advice is to leave baby birds, like this Purple Martin, when you found them. Photo by Stephanie Galea/The Connecticut Audubon Society

The Connecticut Audubon Society cannot accept injured or orphaned animals.

  But there’s good advice on what to do from the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection:

“If you find a young bird on the ground that appears to not have feathers, look for a nest. If a nest is in a nearby tree or shrub and the bird feels warm to the touch, try to place the nestling back into the nest. If the nest has fallen on the ground, make a new nest with a wicker basket and some dry grasses and hang the basket with the nestling in it in a nearby tree or shrub. Most birds have a poorly developed sense of smell and will not be scared away if you touched the young bird. Be sure to watch the nest carefully for at least an hour to see if the adults return to find and feed their nestling.”

It also discusses deer, including fawns:

“The only time a female (doe) will be found with a fawn is during feeding times. Fawns are fed three to four times a day, each feeding lasting about 15 minutes. During the long periods left alone, newborn fawns instinctively freeze and will lay motionless when approached.

“If you come across a fawn, it is best to leave it alone for at least 48 hours to determine whether the adult is returning for feedings,” said Rick Jacobson, Director of the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) Wildlife Division. “While waiting for the doe to return, it is important that both people and dogs stay away from the fawn. A truly orphaned fawn may show signs of distress by walking around aimlessly and calling out for several hours.”

Here’s a list of wildlife rehabilitators.

 

 

 

 

 

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