School Programs: Science In Nature

Science In Nature, our new flagship education program, provides K-12 students outdoor, hands-on, inquiry-based education experiences – one of the largest growing needs for public school students in Connecticut.

Teachers whose students have participated in the program have loved what we offer. Read their evaluation of the program here.

Climate, Geology, Adaptations

Climate/Weather, Geology, Adaptations is a series of three, full-day programs designed for 3rd through 8th graders. The series, based on state and national science, math and literacy standards, is designed to provide students the unique opportunity to process classroom-taught concepts in a real-world ecosystem. Students are the scientists, applying the scientific method while studying weather and climate, geology, and adaptations – concepts that are often challenging for students to comprehend in traditional classroom settings. While the program is most effective as a series of programs within a school year, each can be taught as a stand-alone unit.

These new programs utilize the four habitat types that make up our ecosystem mosaic: woodland, freshwater marsh, meadow and pond. Students will investigate each habitat type with a different “lens” during each visit. In the Weather and Climate program, students will study how these habitats are affected by weather, climate and earth’s behavior in the solar system. During the Geology program, students will investigate how the geologic history of Connecticut impacts these habitats of today, while an in-depth study of how plants and animals have adapted to live in these habitats is the focus of the Adaptations program.

Students will use cutting-edge scientific technology to collect data such as air and soil temperature, wind speed, and soil moisture. They will study soil types and basic geology, witness how erosion shapes landscapes, and inventory plant life. Students, many for the first time, will have the opportunity to be in nature to study the relationships between humans, ecosystems, and earth systems; from how plant growth relates to earth’s rotation and revolution to how wind speed and direction impact bird migration – Climate, Geology, Adaptations helps students make connections and think critically.

Starting in the fall of 2012, we’ll be introducing these programs at our Center at Fairfield and the adjacent 155-acre Larsen Sanctuary, with over a dozen classes in public and private schools from Bridgeport, Trumbull and Fairfield.

We will roll out the new programs at our other centers over the next several years, and will be designing new environmental science programs for high school students.

If you are interested in having your school or class participate, please contact Michelle Eckman, our director of education, at 203 259-6305, ext. 107 or meckman@ctaudubon.org.

 

Two of our Science In Nature teacher-naturalists, Caitlin Holmberg and Matt Pagliaro, work with a group of students. Photo copyright Connecticut Audubon Society.

Pre-K through 2nd Grade
For younger children, we’ll continue our pre-K through 2nd-grade programs. Educators who want more information can click here for details.

9th through 12th Grade
While we are in the process of developing a new environmental sciences program for high school students, any of our current programs can be adapted for high school students.

For information about our programs, please contact:

Caitlin Holmberg, Center at Fairfield. 203-259-6305 x 118 cholmberg@ctaudubon.org

Louise Crocco, Milford Point Coastal Center, 203-878-7440 x502 lcrocco@ctaudubon.org

Kasha Breau, Center at Glastonbury, 860-633-8402 x204 kbreau@ctaudubon.org.

Sara Heminway, Center at Pomfret, 860-928-4948; sheminway@ctaudubon.org

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