Posts Tagged ‘osprey’

 

Osprey Cam

Friday, March 24th, 2017

The Ospreys are nesting at the Milford Point Coastal Center and you can watch them 24 hours a day no matter what the weather.

 

The first two eggs hatched on June 11 and June 12; the third on June 14 but the nestling didn’t survive. Last year, only one of three eggs hatched.

Nest-building started late in the day on April 4 and resumed on April 5. The first egg was laid on Wednesday, May 3, the second on Saturday, May 6, and the third on May 9.

The female will lay eggs 1-3 days apart. Incubation begins with the first egg and takes 36-40 days; the eggs hatch asynchronously, each hatching in the order laid. This gives a distinct advantage to the older chicks in years with meager food supplies. If the weather is bad, all may not hatch. Generally, two or three babies fledge annually. In 2016, she laid three eggs, one of which hatched.

Ospreys were driven to the edge of extinction in the 1960s and early 1970s because of the widespread use of the pesticide DDT. They were listed as endangered and protected by the Endangered Species Act. After DDT was banned, the Osprey population began to thrive.

The Connecticut Audubon Society began its Osprey Nation stewardship program in 2014 to collect data on Ospreys that nest in our state. With more than 200 volunteers, it has grown to become one of the largest citizen science projects in New England.

View the Osprey Cam here to enlarge the screen and use the comments section to tell us what you see.

 

Eagle/Osprey Boat Cruises on the Connecticut River

Friday, April 7th, 2017

Don’t Miss The Boat! Saturday, April 29 at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

Come search for majestic Bald Eagles and welcome Connecticut River Osprey back to their breeding grounds. Cruises will be aboard the motor vessel Becky Thatcher and leave from Eagle Landing State park in Haddam. Connecticut Audubon Society naturalists are on board the vessel to assist in bird identification and share information about the Connecticut River, the birdlife, and natural history.

Click here to make reservations online or call us at 860-767-0660 Monday through Friday.

Osprey Nation (Outdated Webpage)

Thursday, April 21st, 2016

 

 

 

Please re-direct to our updated webpage: www.ctaudubon.org/osprey-nation 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The new Osprey Nation website has additional resources for stewards this year. If you would like to monitor an Osprey nest, please fill out a sign-up form starting March 1st, even if you have monitored in the past! For details on signing up, navigate to the Get Involved in 2017! section. Once you have signed up, you will receive a confirmation email from the Osprey Nation coordinator. Once you start monitoring, please submit your observations using the “Report Your Observations” form found under the Resources for Stewards section. Remember to record your volunteer hours on the DEEP timesheet, found under Resources for Stewards

 

Navigate to:

Background Information

Annual Reports

Get Involved in 2017!

Osprey Nation Map

Resources for Stewards

Osprey Cam

Contact

 

Background Information

Osprey Nation is Connecticut Audubon Society’s citizen science partnership, launched in the summer of 2014, to monitor the health of our state’s Ospreys. The goal of Osprey Nation is to create a long-term record of data that will give the conservation community a better understanding of the health of Connecticut’s Osprey population.

In its first season, Osprey Nation’s 100-plus stewards located 414 nests in five counties and 42 towns, and monitored 174 of those nests. We plotted all the nests and the data submitted by the stewards on the map below. Osprey Nation stewards confirmed that 78 young Ospreys were successfully fledged in 2014, a number that we’re confident is low.

In its second year, the program saw a rise in the number of volunteer stewards, to 146; in the number of nest locations added to the project’s interactive map, to 515; in the number of active nests that were recorded, from 210 to 250; and the total number of hatchlings, from 221 to 415. Observers recorded that 356 of those hatchlings fledged.

In its third year, we had 220 stewards sign up to monitor nests. By the end of the 2016 season, there were 606 nests plotted on the Osprey Nation map. Over 400 of these nests were active, and approximately 500 fledglings were reported this year!

The project is off to a great start but we still need your help and expertise!

Our network of Osprey Nation stewards collects and sends us data on the birds’ arrival dates each spring, the location of nests, nesting success and departure dates. We enter the data on a map for everyone to view. Osprey Nation is a partnership with the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection and we will be submitting the data to DEEP biologists.

We also ask the stewards to monitor the condition of Osprey nesting sites, especially poles, and to work with Connecticut Audubon and the Connecticut DEEP to make sure they are safe and secure.

We are continuing to add nest locations to the Osprey Nation map. We are also looking for trends that would indicate whether the state’s Osprey population is declining or increasing, and what those trends might tell us about water quality and fish populations.

It was only several decades ago that the widespread use of DDT brought these great fish-eating raptors to the brink of extinction. But with a ban on this toxic pesticide and the efforts of government biologists, conservation groups and individuals, Ospreys have made a dramatic comeback.


Annual Reports

 

2014

2015

2016


Get Involved in 2017!

 

  • If you live near an active Osprey nest and can volunteer to monitor a nest about 15 minutes every two weeks, please consider becoming an Osprey nest steward! We will host steward training sessions in early 2017. Please contact us at osprey@ctaudubon.org if you would like to attend a session. To learn more about steward requirements, review the Monitor Guide below:

 Monitor Guide 2017 

 

  • To sign up to join our network of stewards, please fill out an online steward sign-up form below (available March 1st, 2017) to request which nest(s) you would like to monitor. Find available nests on the map below.

Steward Sign-Up Form (Available March 1st, 2017)

 

  • Once you fill out a sign-up form, you will receive confirmation via email of which nest(s) you will monitor. After receiving confirmation, you can start reporting your observations using the online reporting form below!

Report Your Observations

 

  • Your reports will be visible on the Osprey Nation Map below which is updated weekly during the Osprey season.
  • If you know of a nest that is not currently on the map, please report the nest using the online form below.

Report a New Nest


Osprey Nation Map

 

Click on the upper right-hand corner of this map for a full-screen view. Click on the red and green markers for more information about each nest. Green markers indicate nests for which we have stewards; red markers indicate nests for which we are still seeking stewards. Please note that we still do not know all of the locations of Osprey nests in the state. We need your help with that too!


Resources for Stewards

 

6 minute guide for helping Osprey

Monitor Guide 2017 

Steward Sign-Up Form (Available March 1st, 2017)

Report Your Observations

Report a New Nest

DEEP Volunteer Hours


Osprey Cam

 

Link will be available in spring 2017


Contact

 

Contact us at Osprey@Ctaudubon.org with any questions and we will get back to you as soon as possible.


 

 

Osprey Nation: 2014 Final Report

Tuesday, March 17th, 2015
Ospreys in Fairfield. Photo courtesy of Anastasia Zinkerman.

Ospreys in Fairfield. Photo courtesy of Anastasia Zinkerman.

March 10, 2015
In 2014 Connecticut Audubon Society launched Osprey Nation[i], a statewide program aimed to monitor and help enhance the osprey population in the state. In a two pronged approach, the Connecticut Audubon Society has sought to support and facilitate scientific research on the ospreys, particularly the large colony at the mouth of the Connecticut River, and to build a broad citizen science program to monitor their health across the state.

Read more of the report …

Your Annual Gift Supports Osprey Nation

Friday, August 15th, 2014
Ospreys on their nest platform at Milford Point. Photo by Sherri Delaney.

Ospreys on their nest platform at Milford Point. Photo by Sherri Delaney.

Dear Friends,

I write you today on behalf of our state’s Osprey population.

Over the years, residents of Connecticut have been awestruck by the grace of these majestic raptors. The beautiful black and white Ospreys, which nest along our shorelines and catch fish in our waterways, are one of the state’s most iconic birds. This year, we partnered with the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection to launch Osprey Nation, a program that supports essential Osprey research and manages a newly formed citizen-science project to locate and monitor nests across the state.

In its inaugural year, Osprey Nation supported the radio-tracking of three Ospreys at the mouth of the Connecticut River; and brought 160 volunteers together to monitor more than 350 osprey nests across the state. Years ago, this picture would have been gravely different.

Widespread use of pesticides, particularly DDT which caused the thinning of egg shells and made incubation impossible, brought the population of Ospreys crashing down in the 1960s. By 1970 there were fewer than 10 nests in the state, and it wasn’t until a decade after the ban of DDT in 1972 that Ospreys began to make a comeback.

The Osprey population is now strong, but we need your help to ensure that it remains so. At Connecticut Audubon Society we are working diligently with our team of stewards to keep track of Osprey nests, for not only do we revere the beauty of these birds, but their health is a harbinger of ours. Through them we will be attuned to future environmental threats and human health hazards.

Osprey Nation is a critical project, and almost entirely donor and volunteer supported. Our goal for 2015 is to increase the number of nests we monitor to 450.

To ensure that we have the funds necessary for this project, please consider making a gift today. Every dollar donated stays in Connecticut, ensuring the ecological health of our state for future generations.

Together, we can continue to be stewards and advocates for these beautiful birds, and help ensure that the wild denizens of our state will have our support as their needs arise.

I hope we have your support – we cannot do this without your help. Please click here to make a donation.

Sincerely,

Alexander R. Brash
President

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