Connecticut Audbon Society

 

Welcome to Bird Finder, our guide to interesting birds you might be able to find now in Connecticut!

Some of the best birders in the state generously share their expertise here. Patrick Comins, Milan Bull, and Andy Griswold from our own staff. Corrie Folsom-O’Keefe and Genevieve Nuttall from Audubon Connecticut. Greg Hanisek, Stefan Martin, Helena Ives, Chris Wood, Nick Bonomo – a great roster of contributors. Our hope is that Bird Finder will inspire you to go out and find the birds they write about!


Connecticut Birds in the Tropics

January 24, 2019
Leaving for a few weeks in warmer climes? You can still enjoy Connecticut’s birds. Look for Northern Waterthrush among mangroves and Western Sandpiper exploring the salt flats on Tortola, for example, and foraging flocks of Ovenbird, Blue-winged Warbler, and American Redstart in moist tropical forest along the Reef Bay Trail on St. John.

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Mew Gull

January 16, 2019
Where and When To Find It: Cove Island Park, Stamford. Right now. There’s no guarantee we’ll see another. Alternatively, plan on a very long plane ride.

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American Tree Sparrow

January 10, 2019 – They prefer areas that are open and have low vegetation, like field and marshes, but also take advantage of backyard bird feeders. American Tree Sparrows have been frequenting the open grassy fields of the Connecticut Audubon’s Bafflin Sanctuary in Pomfret and of Goodwin State Forest.

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Greater White-fronted Goose

December 8, 2018 Greater White-fronted Goose Anser albifrons by Nick Bonomo Don’t drive by that corn field full of Canada Geese without looking for this needle in a haystack! What it looks like: The size and shape of your standard goose, perhaps a bit smaller than the average Canada Goose. Adults are rather obvious. The […]

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Peregrine Falcon

December 6, 2018 – Look for a darkly-colored raptor zipping through the air or perched high on a ledge. They have a grayish-blue back and black barring on the white underside. Their eyes are pronounced, outlined by a bright yellow ring, and the highly curved bill helps them tear at their food.

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